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Forum Auctions @ Artsy: The Master and The Muse

Thursday 13th September 2018: 5:00pm BST

8Hirst

Hirst

Full Lot Details

Damien Hirst (b.1965)

For the Love of God, Believe

Screenprint in colours with glazes, 2007, signed and numbered from the edition of 1700 in white crayon, on wove paper, published by White Cube, London, the full sheet printed to the edges, 325 x 240mm (12 3/4 x 9in) (framed)

The present work was printed on the occasion of the artist's 2007 exhibition, 'Damien Hirst: Beyond Belief' at White Cube, London. In this exhibition, Hirst delved further into the themes that today define his artistic practice and explorations: death, life, truth, love, immortality and art's place within it all. Pictured is the artist's ultimate 'Memento Mori', an object that addresses the transience of human existence.

To create this stunning image, the artist cast a life-size platinum cast of a human skull, which he then covered in entirely with pavé-set diamonds totalling over 1,100 carats. In the words of art historian Rudi Fuchs, the resulting sculpture is 'out of this world, celestial almost [...] It proclaims victory over decay. At the same time, it represents death as something infinitely more relentless. Compared to the tearful sadness of a vanitas scene, the diamond skull is glory itself.'

Full Lot Details

Damien Hirst (b.1965)

For the Love of God, Believe

Screenprint in colours with glazes, 2007, signed and numbered from the edition of 1700 in white crayon, on wove paper, published by White Cube, London, the full sheet printed to the edges, 325 x 240mm (12 3/4 x 9in) (framed)

The present work was printed on the occasion of the artist's 2007 exhibition, 'Damien Hirst: Beyond Belief' at White Cube, London. In this exhibition, Hirst delved further into the themes that today define his artistic practice and explorations: death, life, truth, love, immortality and art's place within it all. Pictured is the artist's ultimate 'Memento Mori', an object that addresses the transience of human existence.

To create this stunning image, the artist cast a life-size platinum cast of a human skull, which he then covered in entirely with pavé-set diamonds totalling over 1,100 carats. In the words of art historian Rudi Fuchs, the resulting sculpture is 'out of this world, celestial almost [...] It proclaims victory over decay. At the same time, it represents death as something infinitely more relentless. Compared to the tearful sadness of a vanitas scene, the diamond skull is glory itself.'