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The Edge Hall Library

Thursday 12th October 2017: 1:00pm BST

Full Lot Details

America.- Arrowsmith (John) The London Atlas of Universal Geography, engraved throughout, title, contents leaf and 68 double-page engraved maps, all with outline hand-colouring, all with finger tabs (dust-soiled) to fore-edge, maps listed and numbered 1-50 and dated 1842 then an additional 18 unnumbered and unlisted maps with some later dates to 1851, one with short tear near tab, another creased at gutter, generally in excellent and clean condition, contemporary diced half calf, gilt-lettered burgundy morocco label to upper cover, spine worn, [Phillips, Atlases 790], folio, 1842.

One of the great English atlases of the 19th century. Arrowsmith (1790-1870) published his London Atlas originally in 1834, with this new edition appearing in 1842. It was subsequently reissued with the date of the preface and imprints on individual maps revised. This copy is enhanced by an additional 18 Arrowsmith maps, including some of his scarcest and most important:

Sketch of the Acquisitions of Russia, 1842

Ionian Islands and Malta, 1844

West Coast of Africa, 1843

The River Niger, 1843

Eastern Frontier of the Colony of the Cape of Good Hope, 1851

Asia Minor, 1842

The Caspian Sea, Khivah, and the surrounding country, 1841

The Punjab, 1849

Australia (2 sheets), 1850

The Maritime Portion of South Australia, 1840

New Zealand, 1851

Texas, 8th June 1843

Jamaica, 1842

The Leeward Islands, 1842 (creased)

The Windward Islands, 1842

British Guiana, 1842

Discoveries in the Arctic Sea , between Baffin Bay and Melville Island, 1851

The map of Texas is particularly important. It is considered "probably the first to show the full extent of Texas's claim to the region of the upper Rio Grande, an area included within Texas's boundaries until the Compromise of 1850... [and] the best information on Texas geography available in Europe" (Martin & Martin, Maps of Texas and the Southwest, 32). There are four known issues of the Texas map with varying dates from 1841 to 1843 and one later issue dated 1858. Streeter notes that this issue (8th June, 1843) has a number of names added at various places indicating projected land holdings.

Full Lot Details

America.- Arrowsmith (John) The London Atlas of Universal Geography, engraved throughout, title, contents leaf and 68 double-page engraved maps, all with outline hand-colouring, all with finger tabs (dust-soiled) to fore-edge, maps listed and numbered 1-50 and dated 1842 then an additional 18 unnumbered and unlisted maps with some later dates to 1851, one with short tear near tab, another creased at gutter, generally in excellent and clean condition, contemporary diced half calf, gilt-lettered burgundy morocco label to upper cover, spine worn, [Phillips, Atlases 790], folio, 1842.

One of the great English atlases of the 19th century. Arrowsmith (1790-1870) published his London Atlas originally in 1834, with this new edition appearing in 1842. It was subsequently reissued with the date of the preface and imprints on individual maps revised. This copy is enhanced by an additional 18 Arrowsmith maps, including some of his scarcest and most important:

Sketch of the Acquisitions of Russia, 1842

Ionian Islands and Malta, 1844

West Coast of Africa, 1843

The River Niger, 1843

Eastern Frontier of the Colony of the Cape of Good Hope, 1851

Asia Minor, 1842

The Caspian Sea, Khivah, and the surrounding country, 1841

The Punjab, 1849

Australia (2 sheets), 1850

The Maritime Portion of South Australia, 1840

New Zealand, 1851

Texas, 8th June 1843

Jamaica, 1842

The Leeward Islands, 1842 (creased)

The Windward Islands, 1842

British Guiana, 1842

Discoveries in the Arctic Sea , between Baffin Bay and Melville Island, 1851

The map of Texas is particularly important. It is considered "probably the first to show the full extent of Texas's claim to the region of the upper Rio Grande, an area included within Texas's boundaries until the Compromise of 1850... [and] the best information on Texas geography available in Europe" (Martin & Martin, Maps of Texas and the Southwest, 32). There are four known issues of the Texas map with varying dates from 1841 to 1843 and one later issue dated 1858. Streeter notes that this issue (8th June, 1843) has a number of names added at various places indicating projected land holdings.