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Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works on Paper

Thursday 27th September 2018: 1:00pm BST

3

Lot 3

Africa.- Slavery.- Abstract (An) of the Evidence delivered before a Select Committee of the House of Commons in the years 1790, and 1791; on the part of the Petitioners for the Abolition of the Slave-Trade, first edition, James Phillips, 1791 & another (2)

 

Estimate: £500 - 700

Hammer Price: Unsold

Full Lot Details

Africa.- Slavery.- Abstract (An) of the Evidence delivered before a Select Committee of the House of Commons in the years 1790, and 1791; on the part of the Petitioners for the Abolition of the Slave-Trade, xxvi & 155pp., first edition, with folding engraved map of west coast of Africa but lacking folding plan of slave ship, very occasional spotting or soiling, disbound, [Sabin 81745], James Phillips, 1791 § [Harrison (George)] Some Remarks on a Communication from Wm. Roscoe to the Duke of Gloucester...as stated in...the Third Report of the African Institution, 11pp., first edition, title browned, some spotting, final leaf laid down, disbound, George Ellerton, 1810, 8vo (2)

⁂ The African Institution was established in 1807 following the abolition of the slave trade in Britain, with the aim of creating a haven for freed slaves in Freetown, Sierra Leone. The Duke of Gloucester, nephew of George III, was the first President, and William Wilberforce one of its leaders. The abolitionist William Roscoe of Liverpool had proposed that trade with Africa would be the greatest benefit to promoting civilisation in Freetown but George Harrison advises caution. COPAC lists 3 copies of his pamphlet (BL, Newcastle University, and the Society of Friends).

Full Lot Details

Africa.- Slavery.- Abstract (An) of the Evidence delivered before a Select Committee of the House of Commons in the years 1790, and 1791; on the part of the Petitioners for the Abolition of the Slave-Trade, xxvi & 155pp., first edition, with folding engraved map of west coast of Africa but lacking folding plan of slave ship, very occasional spotting or soiling, disbound, [Sabin 81745], James Phillips, 1791 § [Harrison (George)] Some Remarks on a Communication from Wm. Roscoe to the Duke of Gloucester...as stated in...the Third Report of the African Institution, 11pp., first edition, title browned, some spotting, final leaf laid down, disbound, George Ellerton, 1810, 8vo (2)

⁂ The African Institution was established in 1807 following the abolition of the slave trade in Britain, with the aim of creating a haven for freed slaves in Freetown, Sierra Leone. The Duke of Gloucester, nephew of George III, was the first President, and William Wilberforce one of its leaders. The abolitionist William Roscoe of Liverpool had proposed that trade with Africa would be the greatest benefit to promoting civilisation in Freetown but George Harrison advises caution. COPAC lists 3 copies of his pamphlet (BL, Newcastle University, and the Society of Friends).